This data will help all Virginians better understand that the Commonwealth has been a leader in environmental protection and energy consumption reduction for decades. The data also reveals opportunities for improvement, so that policymakers can make informed decisions about regulatory and public priorities.
Virginia should not abandon the current structure entirely. The pure competitive supplier model has plenty of downsides (See Texas).  It is only attractive to so many in Virginians at this time because Dominion Energy Virginia has corrupted the market to unfairly enrich its stockholders.  If all these other steps are taken and electricity costs in Virginia stabilize, the desire to bolt from the monopoly service will wane. 
When Richmond City Council indicates an intention to eliminate the Richmond Gas Works, as it did with a resolution on Sept. 13, that decision does not stop at the city line. Tens of thousands of Henrico and Chesterfield residents and businesses also are served by and depend on that municipal public service utility.
Benchmark U.S. natural-gas prices edged above $5 per million British thermal units this month, near their highest since 2014, but they are fairly tame compared with levels in Europe and Asia. The inventory situation seems less dire at home too as underground natural-gas storage grows. The problem is that seasonal stockpiling isn’t happening quickly enough, with inventories 7.1% below their five-year average and less margin for error.
The Virginia Energy Consumer Trust (“The Trust”) announced its formation today. The Trust’s mission is to educate and empower energy consumers to challenge the binary choice of supporting diverse and affordable energy resources or protecting the environment. Virginians overwhelmingly support reliable, affordable, secure, and sustainable energy. The Trust is the voice for all Virginia consumers that believe in energy justice and environmental stewardship equally.
Bills for an average residential customer of Appalachian Power Co. will go up by about $11 a month, effective July 1. The State Corporation Commission on Tuesday approved a request by Appalachian to raise the rate it charges to cover transmission costs for the electricity it delivers to about 500,000 customers in Virginia.
Consumer Energy Alliance’s latest report has calculated a $25,600 price tag per New York City household if the city continues to follow short sighted goals of banning natural gas use in buildings. The cost to residents will be felt each winter and poses significant challenges to businesses recovering from the COVID pandemic in the short term.